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Thread: Tap beer VS bottles

  1. #1
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    Tap beer VS bottles

    What makes the most sense in terms of profit? Selling tap beer or bottles? What about the price of equipment? (refrigerators VS lines for tap).

  2. #2
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    In a perfect world tap should be cheaper over the long run. Realistically though it's not when you factor in spillage, maintenance, and extra time spent pouring.... But in the end I think the decision to carry tap is more about whether your customers ask for it and if it makes sense for you concept...

  3. #3
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    beer

    draft has always been cheaper per oz to pour. depending on what you charge can change it. if your doing 1$ drafts then your making more on a bottle. it's all how you package it.
    www.thesaltydog.net

  4. #4
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    It really drives me crazy the amount of waste draft beer that gets poured down the drain! I guess it is the cost of doing business? I am a big fan of Draft beer!! As far as dollar drafts go it was a dream of mine to be able to have one all the time. When people are low on cash they still want to go out and be social! I found a brew that cost forty cents a pour. At first it bothered me to be selling so cheap but one Friday I had five guys all drinking dollar drafts. A half hour later I had five more folks enjoying conversation with the dollar draft guys. Before you know it my pub was full! Our motto is we try to make drinking affordable!

  5. #5
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    ministry, I agree that how you market draft is important, but finding that profitable formula is darn difficult. From the popularity of pitchers to the immense size of most beer mugs and glasses, coupled with all the spillage and extra equipment costs of draft, it's hard to beat the bottles from a business standpoint.

    As a customer at a bar, I'm always a little wary drinking from the tap because I know that there's always a decent chance those draft lines haven't been cleaned regularly enough.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by gilbi View Post
    As a customer at a bar, I'm always a little wary drinking from the tap because I know that there's always a decent chance those draft lines haven't been cleaned regularly enough.
    That's exactly why I have always drank bottles

  7. #7
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    Our beer vendor cleans our tap line on a regular basis!

  8. #8
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    Thanks everyone for the great comments. What about the initial cost of equipment? Refrigerators VS Tap lines? Do your distributors offer free refrigerators? Free Tap lines?

  9. #9
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    >> Our beer vendor cleans our tap line on a regular basis!

    If you stay on their ass to make sure they don't miss a cleaning.

    >> Thanks everyone for the great comments. What about the initial cost of equipment? Refrigerators VS Tap lines? Do your distributors offer free refrigerators? Free Tap lines?

    There are a lot of factors here. Running remote kegs you're going to incur some serious setup costs running all those lines. If not running remote it's still a tough comparison. Consider this: the same size cooler can ussually fit many more varieties of bottles than kegs even if the kegs you buy come in the smaller sizes. If you own your own air-cooled ice machine you might even be able to store bottles in bins filled with ice. These bins you can sometimes get for free from the distributor. I've never heard of anyone getting free coolers except from Coca-Cola (but they those times are gone cause they recently started charging a rental fee) and Red Bull (but those coolers are tiny and you probably have to sell a decent amount of red bull to qualify.

  10. #10
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    We reopened a pub that was mostly equipped! The kegs were kept in an old walk in that did not do the job right and the old operators draft was TERRIBLE!! I bought a used Kegerator the big one for $1,200 we actually run ten draft lines out of it!!. It was a sweet deal!! I picked up a sliding two door cooler and we store our spare kegs in that! For bottle beer we have a sliding three door cooler behind the bar and one of the lay down bottle holders it holds 4 brand and a shit load of it! Our place came mostly equipped but it still cost $40 grand to open? Really surprised considering we thought it was going to cost $13,000 the things you learn when you get into it! We sell a lot of beer!

  11. #11
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    I think it practice it's hard to realize the full profit potential of draught vs. bottles. There is a lot of spillage, and there are the not insignificant costs of refrigeration, lines and draught system, and the maintenance on all of that equipment.
    I use my taps for craft beers and microbrews, which have a higher price point, and sell cans for cheap beer options. I have some mid-price bottles as well for people who don't trust taps, although I keep my lines clean.

  12. #12
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    Draught Inventory

    How do you guys inventory your draught beer? It used to be fairly easy for us before we started doing happy hour. Now our keg averages ($ sold) vary too much.

  13. #13
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    Joe is offline What exactly IS the roi of your Mother?
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    weigh em, best way to know

  14. #14
    You should still be getting pretty much the same yield from a keg whether you sell it during happy hour or not. Admittedly there may be more loss if there's an hour of crazy pouring going on during a busy happy hour, but I would follow this method:

    1) At the start of the day, weigh all your kegs. A keg weighing scales is easy to come across. Keep the record safe.
    2) Make sure there is a separate button on the POS for every type of draft served.
    3) Weight the kegs at the end of the night.
    4) Subtract closing weight from opening weight and compare to your sales report for the day.
    5) Take into account any record of giveaways, spillages, recorded drip tray wastage etc.
    6) The difference between the amounts leaving the keg and the amounts paid is the number you want every day.
    7) Share the results with the staff and work to reduce the variances.

    Hope this helps,

    Cheers,

    Barry

    TheBarBlogger.com

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